Obsessive Compulsive Disorder https://www.obsessivecompulsiveexplained.com OCD Explained Mon, 06 Jul 2020 10:10:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://www.obsessivecompulsiveexplained.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/cropped-obsessive-compulsive-disorder-book-cover-32x32.jpg Obsessive Compulsive Disorder https://www.obsessivecompulsiveexplained.com 32 32 What Are the Causes of OCD? https://www.obsessivecompulsiveexplained.com/what-are-the-causes-of-ocd/ https://www.obsessivecompulsiveexplained.com/what-are-the-causes-of-ocd/#respond Thu, 23 Jul 2020 01:30:00 +0000 http://www.obsessivecompulsiveexplained.com/?p=868 What are the causes of OCD? Everyone has experiences with intrusive, random, and sometimes disturbingly strange thoughts. What are the causes of OCD? Most, though, are able to dismiss these thoughts from their consciousness and carry on with their lives. What are the causes of OCD? However, such is not the case for individuals with […]

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What are the causes of OCD? Everyone has experiences with intrusive, random, and sometimes disturbingly strange thoughts. What are the causes of OCD? Most, though, are able to dismiss these thoughts from their consciousness and carry on with their lives. What are the causes of OCD? However, such is not the case for individuals with OCD.

OCD Stats

What are the causes of OCD? Obsessive – compulsive disorder (OCD) is chronic anxiety disorder that can affect men, women, and children regardless of race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic backgrounds. In the United States, 1 in every 40 adults and 1 in every 100 children have or are diagnosed with OCD. OCD is one of the top 20 causes of illness-related disability according to the World Health Organization, observed in individuals between 15 and 44 years of age worldwide.

What exactly causes OCD?

What are the causes of OCD? The exact causes of OCD are not fully understood. Indeed, though it is generally established that OCD is has a neurological basis and is not rooted on past trauma, researchers have been yet unable to come up with any definitive cause or causes of OCD. At most, it is believed that OCD resulted from a combination of neurobiological, genetic, behavioral, cognitive, and environmental factors. These factors may come together in a specific individual at a particular point in time, thus triggering the disorder and leading to the individual to exhibit its symptoms.

A study sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIHM) examined the connection between DNA and the occurrence of OCD symptoms. The results of this study suggest that OCD and certain related psychiatric disorders may be associated with an uncommon mutation of the human serotonin transporter gene (hSERT). 

OCD Diagnosis

What are the causes of OCD? According to the study, people with severe OCD symptoms may have a second variation in the same gene. Other research points to a possible genetic component, as well.  Indeed, around 25% of those diagnosed with OCD have an immediate family member with the disorder too. 

In addition, studies done on twins have indicated that if one twin has OCD, the other is more likely to have OCD when the twins are identical, rather than fraternal.  Overall, studies of twins with OCD estimate that genetics can be attributed for approximately 45-65% of the risk for developing the disorder.

Some other factors may play a role in the onset of OCD, such as behavioral, cognitive, and environmental factors. 

According to Learning Theorists

What are the causes of OCD? Learning theorists indicate that behavioral conditioning may promote the development and maintenance of obsessions and compulsions. More specifically, they believe that compulsions are learned responses that aid in reducing or preventing the anxiety or discomfort associated with obsessions or urges of an individual. 

A person who suffers from intrusive obsession regarding being contaminated by germs, for instance, may engage in hand washing to reduce the anxiety triggered by the obsession. Because this washing ritual momentarily reduces the anxiety, the probability that the individual will engage in hand washing when a contamination fear occurs in the future is increased. This leads to a cycle of compulsions that just gets worse as time goes on.

According to cognitive theorists

What are the causes of OCD? Many cognitive theorists hold to the idea that people diagnosed with OCD have faulty or dysfunctional beliefs. This faulty belief system leads to their misinterpretation of intrusive thoughts, which then results to the formation of the cycle of obsessions and compulsions. 

Cognitive Model

According to the cognitive model of OCD, everyone experiences intrusive thoughts.  People with OCD, however, misconstrue these thoughts as being very important. There is an underlying fear, for instance, that failing to do something just the right way could lead to being severely punished or to being the cause of catastrophic consequences.  The repeated misinterpretation of these intrusive thoughts leads to the development of obsessions. Because the obsessions are so disturbing and troubling, even disrupting regular routine, the individual then thinks that there is no choice left but to engage in compulsive behavior in order to try to resist, block, or neutralize them.

Other factors

What are the causes of OCD? Studies are being made to confirm other factors that may contribute to the onset of OCD. Take for instance environmental factors, which may include traumatic brain injuries: it is shown that there are links between these brain injuries and OCD, as brain function is impaired.

Environmental Factors

Environmental factors may also contribute to the onset of OCD.  For example, traumatic brain injuries have been associated with the onset of OCD, which provides further evidence of a connection between brain function impairment and OCD. There are cases when children suddenly begin to exhibit OCD symptoms after a severe bacterial or viral infection such as strep throat or the flu. Studies state that the infection doesn’t actually cause OCD; instead, it triggers symptoms in children who are genetically predisposed to the disorder.

What are the causes of OCD? Other environmental factors that have been linked to the onset of OCD are stress and parenting styles. However, no research has confirmed these claims. Instead of being the cause of OCD per se, stress is seen as a factor that contributes to the triggering of OCD in someone already predisposed to exhibiting its symptoms. Stress can also exacerbate the symptoms of OCD in someone already diagnosed with it.

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What Doesn’t Cause OCD? https://www.obsessivecompulsiveexplained.com/what-doesnt-cause-ocd/ https://www.obsessivecompulsiveexplained.com/what-doesnt-cause-ocd/#respond Sun, 21 Jun 2020 01:34:00 +0000 http://www.obsessivecompulsiveexplained.com/?p=870 What doesn’t cause OCD? There is often a stigma surrounding mental disorders such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). This is harmful, as it perpetuates the belief that there is something inherently wrong with people with OCD. The truth is people diagnosed with OCD did not do something to cause. No one, after all, would choose to […]

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What doesn’t cause OCD? There is often a stigma surrounding mental disorders such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). This is harmful, as it perpetuates the belief that there is something inherently wrong with people with OCD. The truth is people diagnosed with OCD did not do something to cause. No one, after all, would choose to live with something debilitating to the point of disrupting daily lives and even straining personal relationships. What doesn’t cause OCD? It isn’t caused by how parents talk to their children, or even how they don’t talk to them. It is not caused by parenting styles or how children are disciplined. It is not caused by the presence or absence of one’s parents. The point is, OCD is a neurobiological disorder, and it is not caused by such external factors.  What doesn’t cause OCD? If a person is genetically predisposed to OCD, stress can trigger its symptoms but not necessarily cause it. For someone already diagnosed with OCD, stress or trauma exacerbate the symptoms of the disorder.

Factors that DON’T Cause OCD

Here are some factors mistakenly blamed to be causes of OCD:

Stress

What doesn’t cause OCD? Again, stress doesn’t cause OCD, though its symptoms could sometimes be triggered when one underwent a severely stressful or even traumatic event, such as the death of a loved one. Other triggers may include the birth of a sibling, a divorce, a marriage, or any such huge life events that may overturn one’s routine living.

Illness

What doesn’t cause OCD? Illnesses suffered through ones childhood do not cause OCD. Much like stress, these illnesses such as severe bacterial or viral infections may just trigger symptoms of OCD, especially in those already predisposed genetically to the disorder.

Parenting Styles

There is no existing evidence that the way parents guide, raise, or discipline their children may lead to OCD. In bad parenting cases, it is more likely that the emotional stress just served as the trigger for the onset of OCD.

How to Manage OCD

What doesn’t cause OCD? People diagnosed with OCD can learn to lead normal lives as long as they get the proper help and take the right medication as well as psychotherapy.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

This therapy is the best form of treatment available for OCD, at least currently. Researchers are still conducting numerous studies in their search of brand-new ways to more effectively treat and manage OCD symptoms.

OCD falls under the neurobiological disorder category. As such, it involves behavioral elements and is thus not psychological in origin. Therefore, ordinary therapy won’t work.

What doesn’t cause OCD? Typical methods in cognitive behavior therapy for OCD includes Exposure and Response Prevention. In Exposure and Response Prevention, you will be steadily confronting your fearful thoughts and situations while at the same time trying to resist the compulsions you typically employ to relieve them.

OCD Prevention

What doesn’t cause OCD? The central purpose of Exposure and Response Prevention is to cultivate a tolerance for the thought or situation that makes you anxious. Through Exposure and Response Prevention, you and your subconscious are led to understand that nothing bad will happen if you don’t perform your compulsions. For Exposure and Response Prevention to make some headway in improving OCD symptom management, you would have to be repetitively exposed to the thought or situation. Sometimes, even, you would have to endure it to the point of both mental and emotional fatigue.

Indeed, Exposure and Response Prevention works by wearing out the invasive thought. You will be driven to the point where you have no choice but to acknowledge that no ill effects will befall you if your compulsion is not met. One psychiatrist even said, “You will be too tired to be scared.” As such, Exposure and Response Prevention helps you break the cycle of compulsions that just becomes more severe and harder to resist the more you give into it.

Medication

What doesn’t cause OCD? Medical health professionals and physicians most frequently prescribe selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to people with OCD. These medications assist in raising the amount of serotonin in the body. Some of the brand names of SSRIs include Zoloft, Prozac, Paxil, Luvox, and Anafranil.

OCD Medications

OCD medication usually takes about 8 to 12 weeks to start working well and showing some effects. Depending on the individual, however, results can be observed within three to four weeks. Nevertheless, of the individuals who use medication and subscribe to no other treatment plans, less than 20 percent end up without symptoms. In addition, 20 percent of those who start on medication later need to change their medications to find one that is more effective for them. So it really is a case to case basis.

In Summary

What doesn’t cause OCD? It should be mentioned that medications may have some side effects, including nausea, insomnia, restlessness, diarrhea, sedation, weight gain, dry mouth, and dizziness. If you experience these side effects in a more than mild degree, consult your physician immediately. There could be other alternatives that would serve the same purpose but with lesser discomfort for you. It’s just a matter of finding something that your body won’t reject.

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What You Need to Know About OCD https://www.obsessivecompulsiveexplained.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-ocd/ https://www.obsessivecompulsiveexplained.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-ocd/#respond Tue, 26 May 2020 10:54:00 +0000 https://www.obsessivecompulsiveexplained.com/?p=910 What you need to know about OCD? An individual with OCD may show more telling signs when they obsess about cleanliness and hygiene. What, to others, are natural and normal things required of them to do to go about their day, an OCD patient may find repulsive and repugnant. What you need to know about […]

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What you need to know about OCD? An individual with OCD may show more telling signs when they obsess about cleanliness and hygiene. What, to others, are natural and normal things required of them to do to go about their day, an OCD patient may find repulsive and repugnant. What you need to know about OCD? For some patients the mere thought of opening a door appalls them to their core that they would wait until someone else came along to do it. What you need to know about OCD? The fear of catching or get infected by a virus to them is a deep seated fear which they cannot help and some would try to find ways to cope with their OCD in their own ways – ways that are somehow strange to those around them.

What Triggers OCD?

What you need to know about OCD? To some the thought of touching something another person has touched utterly repulses them because of contamination fear. Others see disorder when things are not facing a certain manner or arranged according to their order bringing to mind Monica Geller; and her obsession about having everything in its place to keep her world in order. 

People with OCD may attempt to stop these obsessions but it just heightens their anxiety and distress driving them to carry out acts of compulsion to ease out their stress; and smooth the kinks often centering on themes privy to them or to select people closest to them. One thing common amongst OCD patients is their fear of losing it and losing control of themselves; but this is so far from the truth. Historically, people with OCD are not capable of actually carrying out unimaginable violence. 

There are a number of reasons and theories to the onset of OCD in individuals. There are those who say that it is a genetic disorder inherited from one generation to another.

OCD Signs and Symptoms

What you need to know about OCD? Compulsions are ritualistic actions a patient performs in order to curb these mental disturbances which make them seem to go unhinged to the trained eye. It is often times visible clues that would suggest a person to have OCD. When the OCD patient internalizes these patterns of unreasonable thoughts are times when it is not as easy to detect the cues.

Perhaps noticeable through actions unnecessary, to what we would consider as the usual method of order; some patients would exhibit excessive obsession in the “little” things. Take for example cleanliness. They may take time brushing one tooth at a time; paying close mind to the number of cleaning brush strokes, displaying worry about their dental hygiene. Others may display symptoms through cleaning sprees, making sure that each nook and cranny of a space is dusted; wiped down, cleaned and disinfected. Others may need things in a certain order or pattern before they are able to do anything else. Like let’s say, a child who needs to do their homework would first need to have everything around her in order; and in its proper place. This may give her the balance she needs to start focusing on the first needful task properly. 

Are You Obsessive Compulsive?

What you need to know about OCD? Patients of OCD have been known to wash their hands repeatedly or compulsively use hand sanitizers which they carry around with them at all times, everywhere. Others have been observed to wear gloves and a face mask for fear of getting infected with germs; perhaps by people they may come in close contact or from the environment in which they need to move about. They are afraid to touch things or people with their bare hands and all of that can become quite overwhelming for them; as it becomes frustrating for those around them.

Perfection is A MUST

Some need perfect symmetry in everything around them that they go around fixing things that they feel are off kilter; out of place or balance, tilted or crooked. There are patients who would line up their clothes in their dressers according the shades and hues of the textile. In others, the disorder is exhibited in the patient as unwanted thoughts; disturbing yet fleeting images of doing or causing harm on themselves or someone else. Others would feel compelled to count repeatedly; then there are those who would check, recheck and go back to check that they have locked all their windows and doors. 

Those with ritualistic behaviors find no pleasure in the actions they carry out but in their minds these are necessary things to do in order to get their world in order. They find fleeting relief in the comforting, assuring, ritualistic actions they carry out. People who have a hard time controlling their train of thought is asymptomatic of the behavioral disorder.  

What Makes You Tick?

There are those who display the disorder as motor tics through vocal tics like throat clearing, snort, grunts, sniffing, coughing. These are sudden, jerky movements, eye blinking or fast eye movements, they repeatedly shrug their shoulders; grimace, shake or nod their heads.

People with OCD, whether they know it or not; may attempt “to cure” themselves by not getting into situations which they recognize as triggers. Others use drugs to calm themselves and then there are those who resort to the bottle. Almost all adults with OCD recognize the fact that the things they do don’t make sense. In children it would usually be the parents or the child’s teachers; who would recognize the manifestation of symptoms of disorder in the child. 

OCD can prevent a person from functioning normally in the world; so it is very important recognize not only the symptoms but also when to get help and see a specialist. OCD can rob someone of the quality of life many of us take for granted. There are available tests to determine if a person has OCD. There is available medication; and therapy which a person or a family member can look into to get help from experts.

When to See a Doctor 

There are mild forms of OCD that can be managed through specific methods aided or not by medication; and allow an individual suffering from it live a close to normal life. Others are moderate forms to severe cases of OCD that make it difficult for the individual to function properly because of the consumption of time it takes them to ease and calm themselves; pretty much disabling themselves from performing everyday tasks. 

If a person shows signs of worsening OC behavioral disorder; it is time to look for a specialist if you haven’t got one already. Some mild cases seem to disappear in its own and the patient is able to manage their lives. Once your quality of life is affected; like not being able to show up for work on time because of the many rituals you need to perform before even starting your day; it is time to get help. 

Not only can this be disabling to you but also the people around you. Some OCD patients especially those who are younger and have limited capacity for vocabulary; and explaining the way they feel; are especially concerning because it causes anxiety to parents when there is in fact several ways of managing the disorder. Performance like the act of getting out of the house can become a chore in itself to a person with OCD; as they make sure that everything that needs to be switched off; or turned off. It’s one thing when a person does this on a frazzling day just to make sure that everything is on the up and up. It is quite a different thing when the time consuming, repetitive actions get in the way of the person’s life. 

It seems that there is a stronger likelihood for children of adults with OCD to have them as well. The simple actions and routine of life becomes taxing and demanding; making it difficult for the patient to live life to its fullest. 

Treatments

There is definitely help out there for those who are seeking confirmation of condition and who want to be able to manage the disorder. Being one of the more common behavioral disorders found in about 1 of 50 people; you can be sure that you are not alone. Having been able to identify a chemical imbalance of serotonin has allowed medical experts come up with medication that can help balance out the lack of this chemical in an OCD patient.

Psychotherapy

Knowing what you are going through and that you are not alone is an empowering feeling of being to take some control over the disorder. It may make you feel embarrassed at first or defensive about your condition but it is important to get the help you need and map out a treatment plan. Consider joining a support group who face the same challenges; it is important for you to know that the struggle is real and you don’t have to go at it on your own. Some conditions are more severe than others and hence it is advisable to know where to get long-term group care in order to cope better. 

Stay goal oriented and never lose sight of your recovery goals. Keep in mind that overcoming OCD is a goal to be made one day at a time. It is an ongoing process for some of the more moderate to severe cases.

Psychosurgery

There are severe cases when patients do not respond to behavioral therapy or medications to alleviate OCD symptoms and psychosurgery are used. There are four kinds of brain surgery that have been proven effective in the treatment of OCD according to the International OCD Foundation. 

Anterior cingulotomy involves drilling a hole into the skull then burning an area of the brain known as the anterior cingulate cortex using a heated probe. This is the first form of psychosurgery which has given and shown positive benefits to 50% of OCD patients who initially displayed resistance to medical and therapy treatments.

The gamma knife is the third sort of psychosurgery to treat OCD and does not require cracking open a patient’s skull. A single dose of gamma ray will not make a dent of difference in harming brain matter. However this changes drastically when an intersection of multiple sources of gamma ray converge. When this happens, this creates energy that is enough to kill a target area of the brain. This procedure using gamma knife rays has given relief to about 60 percent of OCD patients who have shown resistance to treatments.

And lastly, available as well and something to discuss with your doctor is the deep brain stimulation (DBS). This is a procedure which requires operating and opening the patient’s skull but does not entail the destruction of brain tissue.  

How You Can Help Patients with OCD

Not only should you learn more about OCD, the person with OCD should be able to know more about the behavioral disorder as well. There are many educational materials out there about OCD that give extensive, in – depth information about the illness. Look for informative reading materials which give practical tips aimed to help family members of those living with OCD learn to cope.  

A calm support group is essential to the wellbeing and the positive results of treatment for a person with OCD. The support of a loving family can fast track the improved outcome of a treatment for an individual with OCD; whilst criticism, negative comments and snarky remarks could just worsen the situation as well as the symptoms. The best way to help is to approach the OCD behavior and patient with kindness. Simply telling a person with OCD to stop doing what they do when the compulsive behavior could make the person just feel worse because they are not able to follow. 

Focus instead on the strengths of the person; and praise all successful attempts of the person who resist their OCD responses. Make sure that you not expect too much that you push a person too hard; or too little that you allow the person to relapse. A good thing to keep in mind is that no one hates OCD more than the person who has it themselves.

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Does OCD Go Away? https://www.obsessivecompulsiveexplained.com/does-ocd-go-away/ https://www.obsessivecompulsiveexplained.com/does-ocd-go-away/#respond Mon, 20 Apr 2020 01:27:00 +0000 http://www.obsessivecompulsiveexplained.com/?p=866 Does OCD go away? This is a common question especially for people diagnosed with OCD and even those who are concerned that they have it but aren’t sure yet. Does OCD go away? They need some sort of reassurance that they can improve even without treatment, while some just need something to propel them into […]

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Does OCD go away? This is a common question especially for people diagnosed with OCD and even those who are concerned that they have it but aren’t sure yet. Does OCD go away? They need some sort of reassurance that they can improve even without treatment, while some just need something to propel them into taking that first cautious step towards seeking medical help. Does OCD go away? Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic condition, which means it won’t fix itself and it generally cannot be completely cured. Instead, its symptoms are treated so as to not be as invasive as if it were left alone. However, don’t be disheartened. Though OCD can’t be completely cured, people diagnosed with it can still lead normal lives with the proper help, medication, as well as psychotherapy.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

Does OCD go away? This therapy is considered to be the best form of treatment for OCD, at least currently. Researchers continue to conduct studies in search of other newer ways for treating and managing OCD symptoms.

Since OCD falls under the neurobiological disorder category, it involves behavioral components and is thus not psychological in origin. Therefore, ordinary therapy won’t work.

E&RP

Usual methods in cognitive behavior therapy for OCD involves Exposure and Response Prevention, or E&RP. In E&RP, you will be gradually confronting your fearful thoughts and situations while trying to resist the compulsions you typically use to relieve them. The main goal of E&RP is to develop a tolerance for the thought or situation that makes you anxious. It aims to let you and your subconscious understand that nothing bad with happen if you don’t give in to the compulsions.

This requires repetitive exposure, sometimes to the point of mental and emotional fatigue. Indeed, E&RP thrives on wearing the invasive thought out, to the point that you have no choice but to accept that yes, not performing the compulsions have no bad effects after all. This helps break the cycle of compulsions that just becomes more severe and harder to resist the longer it goes on.

Medication

Does OCD go away? Medical health professionals and physicians most commonly prescribe selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to people with OCD. These medications help raise the amount of serotonin in the body. Some of the brand names of SSRIs include Zoloft, Prozac, Paxil, Luvox, and Anafranil.

OCD medication typically takes about 8 to 12 weeks to start working well and showing effects, but some results can show within three to four weeks. However, of people who use medication and no other treatment plans, less than 20 percent end up without symptoms. In addition, 20 percent of those who start on medication later need to change their medications to find one that is more effective for them. So it really is a case to case basis

Side Effects

Does OCD go away? It should be noted that medications may have some side effects, including nausea, insomnia, restlessness, diarrhea, sedation, weight gain, dry mouth, and dizziness.

There is also the stigma that people who use drugs to manage their mental disorder are crazy or delusional. This is wrong on all levels. The need to use drugs doesn’t mean you are weaker; your chemistry just needs these particular medications to help you thrive.

Final Thoughts

Does OCD go away? There is the potential that OCD will stay there in the background, but you could get better. Learning to manage and control the compulsions would let you live a healthy life. To do so, you have to be open to using the tools provided in cognitive behavioral therapy as well as keep taking your prescribed medications if applicable. If you decide to stop without consulting your mental health professional, then there is a chance that you will relapse. Finding yourself hemmed in by symptoms again, you may face a harder time of regaining control once you lost it.

Treatments Plan

The thing with the treatment plans for OCD is most are geared towards helping you manage the symptoms yourself, without the need to rely on others. After all, it is never healthy to become entirely dependent on others when facing your fears. Their support is important and appreciated, but at the end of the day, the one who constantly has to face your fears is you yourself. Does OCD go away? An effective cognitive behavior therapy will teach you to stand on your own and be your own therapist as the process progresses. It will equip you with the tools and knowledge you need to effectively manage your symptoms, allowing you to learn how to handle the rest throughout your life.

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What Are the Categories of OCD? https://www.obsessivecompulsiveexplained.com/what-are-the-categories-of-ocd/ https://www.obsessivecompulsiveexplained.com/what-are-the-categories-of-ocd/#respond Fri, 27 Mar 2020 01:24:00 +0000 http://www.obsessivecompulsiveexplained.com/?p=864 What are the categories of OCD? Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a neurobiological disorder that equally affects men, women, and children, no matter the race, age, and socioeconomic background. What are the categories of OCD? In the United States alone, it affects millions, amounting to 2.3% of the population or around 1 in every 4 adult and […]

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What are the categories of OCD? Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a neurobiological disorder that equally affects men, women, and children, no matter the race, age, and socioeconomic background. What are the categories of OCD? In the United States alone, it affects millions, amounting to 2.3% of the population or around 1 in every 4 adult and 1 in every 10 children. What are the categories of OCD? According to the World Health Organization, it is one of the top 20 causes of illness-related disability around the world, affecting people between 15 and 44 years of age. Worldwide, it is estimated to affect 1 in evert 100 children.

Recognizing OCD

Many people wonder how cases of OCD could have grown exponentially when it was once a rare condition. However, it is far more likely that OCD has always existed this way; the only difference is that more and more people are now seeking treatment for it. Many were afraid of disclosing their condition even to close family members, as there was threat of alienation and being the subject of gossip. Thankfully, OCD has gained more recognition now and more and more people are becoming informed regarding the disease.

What are the categories of OCD? Still, though, only the severe OCD cases tend to come to the attention of mental health professionals. Since OCD often co-exists with other mental health disorders, only a part of the severe cases also receive treatment specifically for OCD.

Effective Treatments

There are plenty effective treatments available today, and people with OCD are able to get much-needed relief from their obsessions and compulsions. It is fortunate, since among mental health disorders, OCD ranks third in proportion of seriously disabling cases, next only to bipolar disorder and drug dependence.

Categories of OCD

What are the categories of OCD? There are various ways in which OCD may manifest. Here are the major categories most people fall under.

Washers

This OCD is characterized by extreme fear of contamination. As such, people under this category of OCD tend to have cleaning or hand-washing compulsions.

Checkers

This OCD is characterized by repeatedly checking things associated with harm or danger. As such, people under this category of OCD tend to check and recheck if the door has been locked and bolted, the oven turned off, and such.

Doubters and sinners

This OCD is characterized by extreme fear that something terrible will come to pass if everything isn’t perfect or done perfectly. People under this category of OCD are also afraid that they will be punished if they did anything wrong.

Counters and arrangers

This OCD is characterized by an obsession with order and symmetry. All things must be neat and orderly. As such, people under this category of OCD tend to have superstitions about certain numbers, colors, or arrangements that must be followed under any circumstance. For instance, all pencils must be arranged according to their color.

Hoarders

This OCD is characterized by an extreme fear that something terrible will occur if they throw anything away. As such, people under this category of OCD compulsively hoards things, even though they don’t need or use it. This often leads to an extremely full room or compartment, which may verge on messy.

How to Get the Appropriate Treatment

What are the categories of OCD? Firstly, becoming knowledgeable about OCD is extremely helpful and recommended. Learning and recognizing the patterns and behaviors associated with OCD is vital as this will allow you to be much more informed when choosing possible treatment plans for you or your loved ones.

How to Choose a Therapist

What are the categories of OCD? It must be noted that not all clinicians are properly equipped to help you treat and manage OCD. Even those with remarkable credentials may be found lacking the proper training to effectively diagnose and treat the disorder. It is critical that you ask the right questions to a cognitive behavior therapist when in the process of choosing. This is where your knowledge of OCD will also come to play; you will be able to determine if the professional is competent and qualified enough to administer cognitive behavior therapy for OCD.

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Who is Affected by OCD? https://www.obsessivecompulsiveexplained.com/who-is-affected-by-ocd/ https://www.obsessivecompulsiveexplained.com/who-is-affected-by-ocd/#respond Thu, 20 Feb 2020 01:16:00 +0000 http://www.obsessivecompulsiveexplained.com/?p=857 Who is affected by OCD? Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common, chronic anxiety disorder that affects men, women, and children regardless of race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic backgrounds. Who is affected by OCD? In the United States, 1 in every 40 adults and 1 in every 100 children have or are diagnosed with OCD. OCD is […]

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Who is affected by OCD? Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common, chronic anxiety disorder that affects men, women, and children regardless of race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic backgrounds. Who is affected by OCD? In the United States, 1 in every 40 adults and 1 in every 100 children have or are diagnosed with OCD. OCD is one of the top 20 causes of illness-related disability according to the World Health Organization, affecting persons between 15 and 44 years of age worldwide. In this article, you’ll learn who is affected by OCD?

What is OCD?

Who is affected by OCD? OCD has two components: obsessions and compulsions. If you are a person with OCD, you realize that these thoughts and compulsions are irrational, and yet, you would not be able to resist them nor break free from them.

The Intrusive Type

Who is affected by OCD? Obsessions are intrusive and sometimes disturbing impulses, thoughts, or images that are persistent and uncontrollable. Take this scenario for instance: a regular person with no OCD would be able to filter out thoughts about germs being present everywhere. However, someone with OCD would not be able to block this out; their thoughts would be full of how germs exist in all places and that they have risks of contamination.

Compulsions

Who is affected by OCD? People with OCD feel compelled to stick to rituals or perform repetitive actions called compulsions. This relieves them of the distress caused by the obsessions. For example, a person with OCD would feel compelled to check and recheck that a door is close to avoid anyone from getting in. Or someone may feel the need to count and recount something to make sure that nothing is missing.

Obssessions are Irrational

As stated before, people with OCD are aware that their obsessions are irrational. And yet the still perform them to relieve their anxiety or discomfort.

Neurobiological Condition

OCD is a neurobiological condition. Like other kinds of illnesses. Unfortunately, people with OCD often are not aware of this, leading to them just suffering in silence.

To learn to manage the symptoms of OCD, a treatment procedure must be able to induce a change in the brain that weakens the old neurological pathways and strengthen new ones. This will help the brain to function normally.

Who is affected by OCD?

This amounts to about 2.3% of the population, reaching to millions.

Diagnosis of OCD

There is no laboratory test currently existing that can identify OCD. The most common diagnostic tool is the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS).

What Other Conditions May Co-exist with OCD?

Many other mental health disorders frequently occur and exist with OCD.  In fact, people diagnosed with OCD are more likely to have one or two other disorders. Some of the disorders that could co-exist with OCD are the following:

  • Anxiety Disorders
  • Major Depressive Disorder
  • Bipolar Disorders
  • Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD)
  • Feeding/Eating Disorders
  • Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
  • Tic Disorders/Tourette Syndrome (TS)

OCD Complications

Several disorders that tend to overlap with OCD share many similarities with OCD. These conditions should also be treated by a qualified mental health therapist:

  • Body Dysmorphic Disorder
  • Hoarding Disorder
  • Trichotillomania (Hair-Pulling) Disorder
  • Excoriation (Skin-Picking) Disorder
  • Other Specified Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders, e.g., body-focused repetitive behavior disorder (such as nail-biting, lip biting, cheek chewing, and obsessional jealousy).

What Kind of OCD Treatment Should You Look For?

Like with any mental disorder, treatment plans for OCD vary depending on the person. OCD medications may include serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs), which help reduce the symptoms. SRIs take around 8 to 12 weeks to start working, though some people report more rapid improvement.

There are also clinical trials as professionals try to find and look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat the disorder. For instance, researchers at the National Institute of Health continue to conduct trials and tests in the search of tomorrow’s breakthroughs.

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What to Talk About With Your Doctor? https://www.obsessivecompulsiveexplained.com/what-to-talk-about-with-your-doctor/ https://www.obsessivecompulsiveexplained.com/what-to-talk-about-with-your-doctor/#respond Sun, 14 Jul 2019 11:24:10 +0000 http://www.obsessivecompulsiveexplained.com/?p=638 What to talk about with your doctor? The aim essentially is to discuss the best medication for each individual. There is no one size-fits-all prescription. Some patients would do well without medication but will undergo therapy. Others are more receptive to doses of medication. Then there are those who respond better to both.  Ideally the […]

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What to talk about with your doctor? The aim essentially is to discuss the best medication for each individual. There is no one size-fits-all prescription. Some patients would do well without medication but will undergo therapy. Others are more receptive to doses of medication. Then there are those who respond better to both. 

Ideally the aim is to identify medication which targets the need of each individual at the lowest possible dosage. There will be a big likelihood of trying out several drugs before you find the proper kind that will help manage the condition. This is why it is very important to be under the supervision of a doctor. It is possible for a doctor to prescribe more than one drug to manage the OCD symptoms better and it may take more than a couple of months to see positive results. 

Another reason why it is important to be under the care and supervision of a doctor when undergoing medication is because of the side effects that may come along with the drugs. Drugs interacting with each other are not unusual since we are all made up differently. Some of these drugs will be anti-depressants and there is a suicide risk in young people and adults who are on it especially for the first few weeks after taking them. Suicidal thoughts are said to also happen when the dosage is changed. The risk doubles exponentially when the medication is suddenly ceased. 

Putting It All Together

Discontinuation syndrome is a physical dependence on the prescribed medication aimed at OCD. This is very different from addiction but has withdrawal-like appearances. Even if you are feeling well, it is not advisable and risky to cease taking medication without discussing it first with your physician. You will need the supervision of your doctor so that they can help you lower and decrease your dosage gradually over time.  

Mixing prescribed medications with herbal supplements and other mind impairing substances such as alcohol or street drugs is very dangerous. It is certainly not wise to do this but it is still something you want to be honest about with your doctor. There are patients who do not respond to medication and or psychotherapy and research continues toward deep brain stimulation to treat OCD. Those who do not respond to the usual approach of treatment could discuss DBS as an option with their doctor.

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What Triggers OCD? https://www.obsessivecompulsiveexplained.com/what-triggers-ocd/ https://www.obsessivecompulsiveexplained.com/what-triggers-ocd/#respond Sun, 07 Jul 2019 11:24:01 +0000 http://www.obsessivecompulsiveexplained.com/?p=636 What triggers OCD? To some the thought of touching something another person has touched utterly repulses them because of contamination fear. Others see disorder when things are not facing a certain manner or arranged according to their order bringing to mind Monica Geller and her obsession about having everything in its place to keep her […]

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What triggers OCD? To some the thought of touching something another person has touched utterly repulses them because of contamination fear. Others see disorder when things are not facing a certain manner or arranged according to their order bringing to mind Monica Geller and her obsession about having everything in its place to keep her world in order. 

People with OCD may attempt to stop these obsessions but it just heightens their anxiety and distress driving them to carry out acts of compulsion to ease out their stress and smooth the kinks often centering on themes privy to them or to select people closest to them. One thing common amongst OCD patients is their fear of losing it and losing control of themselves, but this is so far from the truth. Historically, people with OCD are not capable of actually carrying out unimaginable violence. 

There are a number of reasons and theories to the onset of OCD in individuals. There are those who say that it is a genetic disorder inherited from one generation to another. Then there are experts who say that the behavioral disorder is acquired after a sudden, often traumatic experience and is used by an individual as a way to cope with the anxiety driven situation and inadvertently cause episodes thereafter. 

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